FX Excursions

FX Excursions offers the chance for once-in-a-lifetime experiences in destinations around the world.

Salmonellosis

May 1, 2009
2009 / May 2009

Salmonellosis has been in the news due to contamination of some of the U.S. food supply, with the most recent outbreaks connected to peanut butter and products containing peanut butter. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration are collaborating with public health officials in many states to investigate the continuing outbreaks.

The investigation has led to King Nut Companies, a distributor of peanut butter manufactured by the Peanut Corporation of America, and the company has voluntarily recalled 2,850 items. The recall list is published at the FDA Web site (www.fda.gov).

Salmonellosis occurs when the gastrointestinal tract becomes infected with Salmonella bacteria. The disease has been more common over the past 25 years, with an estimated 2–4 million cases occurring in the United States annually. Emergence of the disease worldwide is attributed to changes in international travel and trade, as well as changes in food production systems, demographics and behavior.

Salmonella typically lives in the intestinal tract of animals, including birds and humans, and is shed through feces. Humans generally become infected through contaminated food, such as poultry, meat and eggs. Your risk for infection is higher if you travel to countries with poor sanitation.

Symptoms start with nausea and vomiting and progress to abdominal pains and diarrhea. Additional signs include fever, chills and muscle pains lasting from several days to two weeks. Most healthy individuals recover without specific treatment. In some cases, diarrhea leads to dehydration, requiring medical attention or hospitalization. Life-threatening complications may develop if the infection spreads into the bloodstream. If you have a healthy immune system, you may not feel ill at all; however, you may continue to shed the Salmonella bacteria in your feces and remain contagious for up to a year.

There are more than 2,000 types of Salmonella bacteria, although fewer than a dozen are responsible for most illness in humans. Each strain causes its own typical symptoms.

Gastroenteritis is caused by the S. enteritidis bacterium, which is most often ingested through raw or undercooked meat, poultry, eggs or egg products. This infection also causes blood to appear in the stool.

Enteric fever (typhoid fever) is caused by the S. typhi bacterium and is most commonly contracted through contaminated drinking water. Additional symptoms include constipation, sore throat, cough, headache and mental confusion.

Bacteremia results when Salmonella enters the bloodstream. Infants, the elderly and those with compromised immune systems are at risk. Other complications include sepsis and meningitis (infection of the tissues surrounding the brain and spinal cord).

Humans usually become infected with Salmonella when they eat foods contaminated with animal feces. Salmonella present on raw meat and poultry can survive if the food is not cooked to a minimum safe internal temperature. Foods may also become contaminated when raw meat or poultry comes in contact with other food, or when a food handler’s hands are not washed after using the bathroom. Foods contaminated with Salmonella look, smell and taste normal.

Salmonellosis is contagious, so take precautions to avoid spreading it to others. Prevention is especially important when preparing foods or providing care for infants, older adults and people with compromised immune systems.

If you think you have salmonellosis, seek medical attention. Your doctor will request a stool sample and a blood specimen for analysis. Call your doctor if you have blood in your stool, if there is no improvement after two to five days or if you experience severe vomiting, abdominal pain or dehydration.

In order to reduce salmonellosis, a comprehensive farm-to-table approach to food safety is needed. Farmers, food importers, inspectors, retailers, food service workers, consumers and travelers — all are critical links in the food safety chain. The CDC leads federal efforts to gather data and investigates food-borne illnesses and outbreaks, and monitors the effectiveness of prevention and control while working with food safety regulatory agencies. Visit www.cdc.gov.


Salmonella Safeguards

• Keep eggs refrigerated below 41 degrees. Eggs should not be unrefrigerated for more than two hours.
• Check egg cartons for expiration date. Discard cracked or dirty eggs.
• Cook eggs at least 15 seconds at 145 degrees and eat promptly after cooking.
• Avoid eating raw eggs, as in homemade ice cream or mayonnaise, cookie dough or eggnog.
• Only consume pasteurized eggs and dairy products.
• Send back eggs, meat or poultry in a restaurant if they are not adequately cooked.
• Separate raw meats from other foods in the shopping cart and in the refrigerator.
• Wash your hands before and after handling uncooked foods.
• Thoroughly clean cutting boards, knives and cooking utensils.
• Use paper towels to clean kitchen surfaces.
• Thaw foods in the refrigerator, in cool water or in the microwave — never at room temperature.
• Wash your hands after contact with all animals and birds, including pets.
• Wash your hands before and after bathroom use.
• Wash your hands after handling human or animal feces, including diapers.

Introducing

FX Excursions

FX Excursions offers the chance for once-in-a-lifetime experiences in destinations around the world.

Explore Excursions

#globility

Insta Feed
Daily
Jun 14, 2024

Former 1940s-Era Italian Bank Transformed Into Rome EDITION Hotel

It is hard to resist the pleasures of Rome, a city filled with world-renowned paintings; sculptures; thousands of colorful cafés; and hundreds of ancient buildings still standing and often used as offices, homes and museums. Certainly, Rome is the cradle from which all that is best about Italy emerged. It is difficult to open a new hotel in Rome without connecting it to the city’s history, art and culinary tradition. When Rome EDITION opened last year, it was the perfect fit for a city that lives and breathes all things extraordinary.

Paradisus by Meliá Redefines the All-Inclusive Experience

Paradisus by Meliá, a leading luxury all-inclusive resort brand, is taking the hospitality world by storm with its latest developments. With a slew of exciting developments, including a fresh property in Punta Cana, an adults-only resort in Los Cabos, an enticing chef partnership, revamped suites and much more, the brand is setting new standards for all-inclusive excellence. Each property maintains the essence of all-inclusive luxury while immersing guests in the rich tapestry of its destination, offering bespoke experiences that celebrate local culture and heritage. Paradisus is on a mission to redefine the all-inclusive paradigm, moving beyond conventional expectations to deliver personalized, lavish experiences tailored to every guest.

June 2024
Jun 14, 2024

Loyalty Programs Revamp to Meet Changing Customer Preferences

Airlines and hotels consistently tweak loyalty programs to draw brand engagement based on shifting consumer habits, and the demands of younger generations make an impact. According to Chris Galloway, executive vice president, Strategy & Design, for brand loyalty experts Brandmovers, millennials are more active and engaged in loyalty programs than any other generation to date, and as Gen Z gains in buying/spending power, they also accelerate in their desire for loyalty and rewards programs.

Daily
Jun 14, 2024

Luxury Italian Farmhouse Launches 3 Seasonal, Hands-On Culinary Experiences

This summer, guests staying at Casetta Firenze, a luxury farmhouse in the Chianti region of Tuscany, can book three culinary workshops led by experts in the art of pasta making, traditional Tuscan dishes and vegetarian cuisine. Each workshop offers a multicourse meal, local produce and complementary wine.

Why Buy Trip Cancellation Insurance?

Don’t risk losing all the money you’ve spent if you must cancel your trip at the last minute. Allianz Travel Insurance can give you:

Daily
Jun 14, 2024

Top U.S. States for Golfers

Relocation experts at My Baggage recently conducted a study to determine the top U.S. states for golfers by analyzing the distribution of golf courses, driving ranges, tournaments and golf coaches per 100,000 residents in every state, along with the number of platinum clubs. From there, each location was assigned a score and ranked accordingly.

Daily
Jun 12, 2024

Langham Hospitality Group Opens Cordis-Branded Hotel in Foshan, China

Langham Hospitality Group opened a new hotel under its upscale Cordis Hotels & Resorts brand, situated in the southern Chinese city of Foshan, a key urban center in the country’s Greater Bay Area. The Cordis, Foshan and Lingnan Tiandi Hotel is becoming a promising destination for both tourists and business travelers thanks to its planned upgrades and prime location in Lingnan Tiandi.

IHG Hotels & Resorts: Elevating the Guest Experience & Expanding Globally

With a robust portfolio of brands catering to diverse traveler preferences, IHG has been on a strategic trajectory to conquer key markets worldwide. The IHG footprint continues to grow, offering unparalleled experiences to guests around the globe.

eFlyer Reviews
Jun 12, 2024

Hôtel des Grands Voyageurs Review

It’s often declared Paris’ Left Bank, or La Rive Gauche, the local side of the Seine —  where bohemian and chic are used superfluously, albeit with some veracity. It only makes sense that travelers looking to stay on the Left Bank would seek as local an accommodation as possible — Hôtel des Grands Voyageurs is the new kid on the block and certainly delivers this with its design following the likes of a Parisian art collectors’ residence.